INFANTSEE

Through InfantSEE®, Dr. Ashley Roth will provide a one-time, comprehensive eye assessment to infants between 6 and 12 months of age, offering early detection of potential eye and vision problems at no cost regardless of income.

We are pleased to announce that Dr. Ashley Roth is now a participating provider for InfantSee at Eye Desire and Roth Eye Care!

The InfantSEE® program:
Provides no-cost access to an eye-care doctor who has the instruments and resources not available to general-care doctors like pediatricians and family physicians
Detects potential problems that, if undetected, may lead to learning and developmental issues later
Gives new parents the peace of mind that their infant’s vision is developing properly.

Prevalence of Vision Problems and Eye Diseases That Will Develop in Children

  • 1 in 10 children is at risk from undiagnosed vision problems

  • 1 in 30 children will be affected by amblyopia – often referred to as lazy eye – a leading cause of vision loss in people younger than 45 years

  • 1 in 25 will develop strabismus – more commonly known as crossed-eyes – a risk factor for amblyopia

  • 1 in 33 will show significant refractive error such as near-sightedness, far-sightedness and astigmatism

  • 1 in 100 will exhibit evidence of eye disease – e.g. glaucoma

  • 1 in 20,000 children have retinoblastoma (intraocular cancer) the seventh most common pediatric cancer

The InfantSEE® Assessment Explained
The InfantSEE® assessment offers early detection of potential eye and vision problems as a complement to the eye screening conducted in a pediatric well-care visit. A comprehensive assessment between the ages of 6 months and 12 months is recommended to determine healthy development of vision. Risk factors for many eye conditions, including amblyopia (often referred to as lazy eye), muscle imbalances, and some ocular diseases, have no signs or symptoms and may not be detected in a well-baby check-up. Such pediatrician visits include care and services performed by all personnel and last an average of 22.1 minutes, which is ample time for screening and detecting potential large-scope health problems. However, significant risk factors for eye and vision disorders are not detectable by base-level infant eye screening, and even early retinoblastoma, the seventh most common pediatric cancer, is detected more than 80 percent of the time outside the doctor’s office by a family member or friend.
How an InfantSEE® Assessment Is Conducted

Although infants cannot speak, optometrists have the clinical education, training and experience, as well as the instruments and resources, to provide non-invasive eye and vision assessments for any non-verbal patients such as infants. Additionally, volunteer InfantSEE® optometrists have access to additional AOA training in working effectively with babies – and parents.
During the assessment, parents might hold the baby on their laps or on a lap pillow and might also assist by holding targets or toys to hold the baby’s attention. Optometrists will gauge the babies’ comfort levels with specific techniques and adjust them as necessary, but will typically evaluate visual acuity, refraction, motility, alignment, binocularity and overall eye health. As detailed below, these tests will determine signs of strabismus, amblyopia or diseases of the eye.

Visual Acuity/Refractive Status – Assessments for visual acuity and refraction are largely intended to measure for nearsightedness or farsightedness – common risk factors for amblyopia, which develops when an otherwise healthy eye has not received adequate use during early childhood. Nearsightedness or farsightedness in an infant’s developing eye can cause the brain to favor seeing through one eye, suppressing vision in the other eye, which can lead to permanent vision impairment.

Because the traditional eye chart with letters or symbols cannot be used with infants, assessment of visual acuity may include tests to ensure that the infant can fix his eyes on an object and follow it. Tools such as gray cards with various sized stripes or pictures may be used to determine at which objects the baby prefers to look, and at what distances. The doctor may also use lenses and light from a small hand-held instrument to assess how the eye responds to particular targets. Some doctors use photographic testing to analyze the pupil reflex in the photo. In many cases, the infant may have some degree of refractive condition not requiring intervention.

Ocular Motility/Alignment/Binocular Potential – Assessments for motility, alignment and binocularity can determine the presence of strabismus, which occurs when one eye does not aim at the same object as the other eye. Strabismus can lead to amblyopia, if undetected, or may indicate a number of ocular diseases.

These assessments also measure eye coordination, which is the ability of both eyes to work together as a team to create one three-dimensional image in the brain. Good eye coordination, a skill that is not innate and must be developed, keeps the eyes in alignment. Later in life, poor eye coordination can make reading for extended periods of time difficult and may result in avoidance of detail work, such as writing or art work, poor reading comprehension and clumsiness.

Using very simple instruments, such as penlights, finger puppets or toys, the optometrist tests the eye’s ability to move by getting the baby’s attention and observing how the baby follows the movements of the object. By shining a penlight toward the baby’s eyes, the doctor can gauge eye alignment, which is straight if the light is reflected in the center of both eyes. The optometrist can also assess a baby’s depth perception by using red/green glasses (commonly known as 3-D glasses), and displaying 3-D pictures. To a baby with good eye coordination, the pictures will appear in 3-D, and the infant will then reach to touch the picture.

Overall Eye Health – The optometrist will assess the eye’s external structure as well as eyelids, tear ducts and other parts of the eye. Often, the optometrist can detect existing allergies from an external assessment.

Pupil function is then checked, followed by an examination of the inner eye through dilated pupils, which can also detect ocular diseases such as retinoblastoma, the seventh most common pediatric cancer.
Following the assessment, in addition to sharing findings with the parents, the optometrist may send summary information to the infant’s pediatrician, family physician or other appropriate practitioners reporting and explaining any significant condition diagnosed in the course of the assessment.

For further information visit www.infantsee.org.
You can schedule your baby’s eye exam with Dr. Ashley Roth by calling our office today.

/ Blog, Eye Health, Optometry

EYE DROPS

Do you use your eye drops properly? Properly administering eye drops ensures that your medication or artificial tear is effective.

/ Blog, Optometry

MARCH IS SAVE YOUR VISION MONTH!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
The 21st Century Eye: Three Ways to Protect Your Vision
Tips for Save Your Vision Month from Dr. Ashley Roth
Miami FL March 1, 2015 – Everywhere we look, we’re reading, shopping, banking or being entertained online on digital devices small and large—at work, at school, at play and on our way in-between. In fact, according to the American Optometric Association’s (AOA) 2014 American Eye-Q® survey, 55 percent of adults use computers, smartphones, tablets or other handheld devices for five or more hours a day. And a separate AOA survey showed that 83 percent of children between the ages of 10 and 17 use an electronic device for more than three hours a day. Digital use will continue to increase, making it more important than ever for consumers to make smart eye care choices and to see an eye doctor for yearly comprehensive eye exams.

Below are three tips from Dr. Ashley Roth and Dr. David Roth in observance of AOA’s Save Your Vision Month in March.

Give Your Eyes a Break
Dr. Ashley Rothrecommends following the 20-20-20 rule to ward off digital eye strain–take a 20-second break every 20 minutes and view something 20 feet away.

“Although ongoing technology use doesn’t permanently damage vision, regular, lengthy use of technology may lead to a temporary condition called digital eye strain,” said Dr. Ashley Roth. “Symptoms can include burning or tired eyes, headaches, fatigue, loss of focus, blurred vision, double vision or head and neck pain.”

Early research has also shown that overexposure to high-energy, short-wavelength blue and violet light emitted from electronic devices may contribute to digital eye strain. Blue light could also increase the likelihood of developing serious eye conditions such as age-related macular degeneration. Optometrists offer lens options including non-glare, filtering lenses, to help protect vision from harmful blue light.

Be a Savvy Shopper
Shopping online can be great for some products that aren’t individually custom-made like prescription eyeglasses are; health and safety trump convenience when it comes to eyewear. Internet orders often result in incorrect prescriptions or other problems with products that get sent through the mail, costing consumers more time and money in the long run. According to a 2011 study conducted by the AOA, the Optical Laboratories Association and The Vision Council, nearly half of all glasses ordered online had either prescription errors or failed to meet minimum safety standards.

“Eyeglasses are an investment in your health and must be custom-fitted not only to be comfortable, but also to be sure precise prescription needs are met so that you’re actually seeing your best,” said Dr. David Roth.

Skip Shortcuts

When it comes to really seeing what’s going on with your eyes, there is no substitute for a comprehensive, yearly eye exam by an eye doctor. Despite catchy claims, there is truly no ‘app’ for that. While a variety of new mobile applications claim to evaluate vision or the fit of eyeglasses, often these apps give inaccurate or misleading information, and misinformed consumers end up delaying essential, sight-saving exams. Early diagnosis and treatment are critical and can often prevent a total loss of vision and improve quality of life.

“Comprehensive, yearly eye exams are one of the most important, preventive ways to preserve vision, and the only way to accurately assess eye health, diagnose an eye disorder or disease, and determine if you need corrective lenses,” said Dr. Ashley Roth.

To make an appointment for a comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Ashley Roth or Dr. David Roth or for additional information on eye health in the 21st century, please visit our website at www.eyedesire.com or email us directly at eyedesire2020@aol.comXX/

Roth Eye Care Eye Desire
136 NE 2nd Ave 1211 17th Street
Miami FL 33132 Miami Beach FL 33139
Phone: 305-371-2020 Phone: 305-673-1211

Fax: 305-374-2123 Dr. David Roth & Dr. Ashley Roth Fax: 305-532-7684

About the American Eye-Q® survey:

The ninth annual American Eye-Q® survey was created and commissioned in conjunction with Penn, Schoen & Berland Associates (PSB). From March 20-25, 2014, PSB conducted 1,000 online

interviews among Americans 18 years and older who embodied a nationally representative sample of the U.S. general population. (Margin of error is plus or minus 3.10 percentage points at a 95% confidence level)

About the Children’s Omnibus survey:
The children’s Omnibus survey was created and commissioned in conjunction with Penn, Schoen & Berland Associates (PSB). From March 24-31, 2014, PSB conducted 200 online interviews from March 24-31, 2014 with children ages 10 to 17. (Margin of error is plus or minus 6.93 percentage points at a 95% confidence level)

About the American Optometric Association (AOA):
The American Optometric Association, a federation of state, student and armed forces optometric associations, was founded in 1898. Today, the AOA is proud to represent the profession of optometry, America’s family eye doctors, who take a leading role in an individual’s overall eye and vision care, health and well-being. Doctors of optometry (ODs) are the independent primary health care professionals for the eye and have extensive, ongoing training to examine, diagnose, treat and manage disorders, diseases and injuries that affect the eye and visual system, providing two-thirds of primary eye care in the U.S. For information on a variety of eye health and vision topics, and to find an optometrist near you, visit aoa.org.

/ Blog, Eye Health, Optometry

PARENTS: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT “PINK EYE”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Parents: What You Need to Know About “Pink Eye”

Dr. Ashley Roth offers tips to help
protect your family from eye infections
Miami Beach FL, March 17, 2015 – As cold and flu season continues to show its ugly face in our communities, Dr. Ashley Roth encourages families to practice good hygiene habits to prevent the spread of infectious disease, including conjunctivitis, also known as “pink eye,” which can be easily spread, especially this time of year.

What is conjunctivitis?

Conjunctivitis is an inflammation or infection of the conjunctiva, the thin transparent layer of tissue that lines the inner surface of the eyelid and covers the white part of the eye. Conjunctivitis is a common eye disease, especially in children, and because it is contagious, it usually starts in one eye and spreads to the other, affecting both eyes.
If your child has conjunctivitis, he or she may experience the following symptoms:

  • A gritty feeling in one or both eyes
  • Itching or burning sensation in one or both eyes
  • Excessive tearing
  • Discharge coming from one or both eyes, usually causing the eyes to be “sticky” upon awakening.
  • Swollen eyelids
  • Pink discoloration to the whites of one or both eyes
  • Increased sensitivity to light

What causes conjunctivitis?

“Conjunctivitis is commonly caused by contagious viruses associated with the common cold,” said Dr. Ashley Roth “This type of pink eye can be spread easily, especially among children in school, due to their close proximity to others. However, it’s usually a minor infection and can be treated easily. Conjunctivitis can also occur from a bacterial infection, which can happen if someone touches their eye with unclean hands or if they were using contaminated cosmetics or other facial products.”
In addition, conjunctivitis can be caused from irritants and chemicals (pollen, smoke, and chlorine in swimming pools) or allergens (pet dander or dust mites).

How is conjunctivitis treated?

“The appropriate treatment for conjunctivitis depends on its cause,” said Dr. Ashley Roth. “Conjunctivitis caused by a viral infection can’t be treated with antibiotics; it simply has to run its course, like with the common cold. Cool compresses, extreme care with hygiene, and artificial tear solutions are effective home remedies.”

Bacterial conjunctivitis is usually treated with antibiotic eye drops or ointments prescribed by your eye doctor. Patients could see improvement after three of four days of treatment, but the entire course of antibiotics must be taken to prevent the bacteria from mutating and the conjunctivitis from returning.

Preventing conjunctivitis
Practicing good hygiene habits, including the steps below, is the best way to control the spread of conjunctivitis:

  • Cover your mouth when coughing or sneezing and do not touch or rub your eyes with your hands (coughing into the middle arm/sleeve helps to prevent spread through hands).
  • Regularly disinfect surfaces such as countertops, bathroom vanities, and door handles with an appropriate antibacterial cleaner.
  • Wash your hands thoroughly and frequently and try to avoid touching the eyes or mouth.
  • Change your towel and washcloth daily, and don’t share them with others. If one eye is infected, don’t use the same cloth on the other eye.
  • Replace liquid forms of eye makeup and wash makeup brushes with antibiotic soap products.
  • Don’t use anyone else’s personal eye care items (mascara, etc.)

If you suspect your child has conjunctivitis, Dr. Ashley Roth can determine if he or she has the infection and advise you on treatment options. To make an appointment with Dr. Ashley Roth call 305-673-1211 (Miami Beach) or 305-371-2020 (Downtown Miami)

Eye Desire Roth Eye Care
1211 17th Street 136 NE 2nd Ave
Miami Beach FL 33139 Dr. Ashley Roth Dr. David Roth Miami FL 33132
Phone 305-673-1211 Phone 305-371-2020
Fax 305-532-7684 Fax 305-374-2123

/ Blog, Eye Health, Optometry

OPTOMETRY OFFICE WAITING ROOM

If you are holding your reading material far away or too close its probably time for you to come in and see us for your eye exam!

/ Blog, Eye Health, Optometry

CONTACT US

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You can text our Miami Beach office at 305-673-1211 or our downtown office at 305-374-5127

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